Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2012

After writing the post about the link between managing spasm and improving walking, I continued thinking about how important it is to never, never give up. No matter the obstacles, challenges, frustrations, fears never give up. I had this image in my head of enormous blocks that are seemingly unsurmountable …

Never, Never Give Up

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

OR: FINALLY, A MEDICAL EXPLANATION HOW THIS INCOMPLETE PARAPLAEGIC’S WALKING CONTINUES TO IMPROVE

I came across an article from the University of Washington that blew my mind. I am excited, delighted and vindicated.

Some highlights:

Spasm caused by spinal cord injury can prevent voluntary movement of weak muscles. Sounds pretty simple. Except it’s not. Spasm can be complex and the cause, other than the obvious one that it is caused by sci,can be difficult to identify. Pain that is not felt can cause spam, so pain killers can help reduce spasm. Stretching can help reduce spasm. Weight-bearing and walking can reduce spasm. Good postural alignment whether sitting or standing can replasma spasm.

I’ve already learnt this through experimention. I take a cocktail of prescription drugs from muscle relaxants, to pain killers, to anti-epileptics, to a neural enhancer. I exercise five days a week at the gym under the supervision of a personal trainer who creatively extends my range of movement and improves mobility through gentle exercises that target weak muscles, and finds ways of reconnecting neural pathways. I stretch at regular intervals during the day.

Here’s the eye-opener though.Spastic muscles not only inhibit weak voluntary opposing muscles, they also take up residence in synapses and axons and make them unavailable to voluntary muscles! So get rid of the spasm, and nerves can reconnect to voluntary muscles! That goes a long way to explaining rapid improvement in my walking over the last two years – since my spasm was finally under control.

It still doesn’t explain why muscles that had no movement, have gradually become enervated, suggesting that the central nervous system can repair itself!

So never, never, never give up!

Read Full Post »